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Percy Bysshe Shelley biography :

Coming soon

   
   
 

Poems by Percy Bysshe Shelley :

A Summer Evening

Autumn: A Dirge

Bereavement

Hymn Of Pan

Love's Philosophy

Mutability

On A Dead Violet

Ozymandias

Song

Song Of Proserpine

Stanzas Written In Dejection Near Naples

The Cloud

The Indian Serenade

The Witch Of Atlas Part 1

The Witch Of Atlas Part 2

The Witch Of Atlas Part 3

To A Skylark

To Coleridge

To Jane

To Night

When The Lamp Is Shattered

A Lament by Percy Bysshe Shelley

A Summer Evening by Percy Bysshe Shelley

A Summer Evening Churchyard, Lechlade, Gloucestershire by Percy Bysshe Shelley

A Widow Bird Sate Mourning For Her Love by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Adonais by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Adonais: An Elegy on the Death of John Keats by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Alastor: or, the Spirit of Solitude by Percy Bysshe Shelley

An Exhortation by Percy Bysshe Shelley

And like a Dying Lady, Lean and Pale by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Archy's Song from Charles the First by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Art Thou Pale For Weariness by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Asia: From Prometheus Unbound by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Autumn: A Dirge by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Bereavement by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Chorus from Hellas by Percy Bysshe Shelley

English In 1819 by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Epipsychidion (excerpt) by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Feelings Of A Republican On The Fall Of Bonaparte by Percy Bysshe Shelley

fragment: To The Moon by Percy Bysshe Shelley

From 'Adonais,' 49-52 by Percy Bysshe Shelley

From the Arabic, an Imitation by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Good-Night by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Hellas by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Hymn Of Pan by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Hymn To Intellectual Beauty by Percy Bysshe Shelley

I Arise From Dreams Of Thee by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Invocation by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Julian and Maddalo (excerpt) by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Lift Not The Painted Veil Which Those Who Live by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Lines by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Lines Written Among The Euganean Hills by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Lines Written in the Bay of Lerici by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Love's Philosophy by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Mont Blanc by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Mont Blanc: Lines Written in the Vale of Chamouni by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Music, When Soft Voices Die by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Mutability by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Night by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Ode To The West Wind by Percy Bysshe Shelley

On A Dead Violet by Percy Bysshe Shelley

On Death by Percy Bysshe Shelley

One sung of thee who left the tale untold by Percy Bysshe Shelley

One Word Is Too Often Profaned by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Prometheus Unbound: Act I (excerpt) by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Queen Mab: Part VI (excerpts) by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Remorse by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Song by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Song Of Proserpine by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Song: Rarely, rarely, comest thou by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Stanzas Written In Dejection Near Naples by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Cloud by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Fitful Alternations Of The Rain by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Indian Serenade by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Invitation by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Question by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Triumph of Life by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Two Spirits: An Allegory by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Waning Moon by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Witch Of Atlas Part 1 by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Witch Of Atlas Part 2 by Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Witch Of Atlas Part 3 by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Time by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Time Long Past by Percy Bysshe Shelley

To by Percy Bysshe Shelley

To A Lady, With A Guitar by Percy Bysshe Shelley

To A Skylark by Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Coleridge by Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Jane by Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Night by Percy Bysshe Shelley

To The Men Of England by Percy Bysshe Shelley

To The Moon by Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Wordsworth by Percy Bysshe Shelley

When The Lamp Is Shattered by Percy Bysshe Shelley

 


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To A Lady, With A Guitar by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Ariel to Miranda: -- Take
This slave of music, for the sake
Of him who is the slave of thee;
And teach it all the harmony
In which thou canst, and only thou,
Make the delighted spirit glow,
Till joy denies itself again
And, too intense, is turned to pain.
For by permission and command
Of thine own Prince Ferdinand,
Poor Ariel sends this silent token
Of more than ever can be spoken;
Your guardian spirit, Ariel, who
From life to life must still pursue
Your happiness, for thus alone
Can Ariel ever find his own.
From Prospero's enchanted cell,
As the mighty verses tell,
To the throne of Naples he
Lit you o'er the trackless sea,
Flitting on, your prow before,
Like a living meteor.
When you die, the silent Moon
In her interlunar swoon
Is not sadder in her cell
Than deserted Ariel.
When you live again on earth,
Like an unseen Star of birth
Ariel guides you o'er the sea
Of life from your nativity.
Many changes have been run
Since Ferdinand and you begun
Your course of love, and Ariel still
Has tracked your steps and served your will.
Now in humbler, happier lot,
This is all remembered not;
And now, alas! the poor sprite is
Imprisoned for some fault of his
In a body like a grave --
From you he only dares to crave,
For his service and his sorrow,
A smile today, a song tomorrow.

The artist who this idol wrought
To echo all harmonious thought,
Felled a tree, while on the steep
The woods were in their winter sleep,
Rocked in that repose divine
On the wind-swept Apennine;
And dreaming, some of Autumn past,
And some of Spring approaching fast,
And some of April buds and showers,
And some of songs in July bowers,
And all of love; and so this tree, --
O that such our death may be! --
Died in sleep, and felt no pain,
To live in happier form again:
From which, beneath Heaven's fairest star,
The artist wrought this loved Guitar;
And taught it justly to reply
To all who question skilfully
In language gentle as thine own;
Whispering in enamoured tone
Sweet oracles of woods and dells,
And summer winds in sylvan cells;
-- For it had learnt all harmonies
Of the plains and of the skies,
Of the forests and the mountains,
And the many-voiced fountains;
The clearest echoes of the hills,
The softest notes of falling rills,
The melodies of birds and bees,
The murmuring of summer seas,
And pattering rain, and breathing dew,
And airs of evening; and it knew
That seldom-heard mysterious sound
Which, driven on its diurnal round,
As it floats through boundless day,
Our world enkindles on its way:
-- All this it knows, but will not tell
To those who cannot question well
The Spirit that inhabits it;
It talks according to the wit
Of its companions; and no more
Is heard than has been felt before
By those who tempt it to betray
These secrets of an elder day.
But, sweetly as its answers will
Flatter hands of perfect skill,
It keeps its highest holiest tone
For one beloved Friend alone.