Famous Poems . . . Famous Love Poems . . . Famous Short Poems . . . Famous Funny Poems . . . by great poets!

Famous Poems

 
 Famous Poems
Poets

Alexander Pope

Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin

Alfred Edward Housman

Algernon Charles Swinburne

Allan Ramsay

Ambrose Bierce

Amelia Opie

Andrew Marvell

Anna Lætitia Barbauld

Anne Bradstreet

Anne Bronte

Anne Killigrew

Aphra Behn

Cecil Frances Alexander

Charles E. Carryl

Charles Kingsley

Charles Stuart Calverley

Charlotte Bronte

Christina Georgina Rossetti

Christopher Marlowe

Daniel Decatur Emmett

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

David Bates

E. Pauline Johnson



Edgar Allan Poe

Edith Nesbit

Edmund Spenser

Edward Lear

Edward Thomas

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Emily Bronte

Emily Dickinson

Ernest Dowson

Francis Beaumont

Francis Quarles

Francis Scott Key

Gelett Burgess

Geoffrey Chaucer

George Gascoigne

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Giacomo Leopardi

Helen Hunt Jackson

Henry King

Henry Lawson

Henry Vaughan

Henry VIII

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Hilaire Belloc

Isabella Valancy Crawford

James Whitcomb Riley

John Askham

John Boyle O'Reilly

John Donne

John Dryden

John Gay

John Henry Newman

John Keats

John Masefield

John McCrae

John Milton

John Newton

John Oldham

Jorge Luis Borges

Joseph Addison

Joseph Rodman Drake

Joyce Kilmer

Julian Grenfell

Katharine Lee Bates

Katherine Mansfield

Lascelles Abercrombie

Leigh Hunt

Letitia Elizabeth Landon

Lewis Carroll

Li Po

Lord Alfred Tennyson

Lord Byron

Major Henry Livingston Jr.

Mark Akenside

Mary Barber

Mary Elizabeth Coleridge

Matthew Arnold

Muriel Stuart

Nicholas Brenton

Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Wendell Holmes

Oscar Wilde

Paul Laurence Dunbar

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Peter Gilligan

Phillis Wheatly

Queen Elizabeth I

Raymond Knister

Richard Barnfield

Richard Harris Barham

Richard Lovelace

Robert Blair

Robert Browning

Robert Burns

Robert Frost

Robert Greene

Robert Herrick

Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert W. Service

Rudyard Kipling

Rupert Brooke

Samuel Johnson

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Sappho

Sarah Flower Adams

Sarah Teasdale

Sidney Lanier

Sir George Etherege

Sir John Suckling

Sir Thomas Wyatt

Sir Walter Raleigh

Spike Milligan

Stephen C. Foster

Stuart Macfarlane

Stuart McLean

T. S. Eliot

Thomas Bateson

Thomas Campbell

Thomas Campion

Thomas Edward Brown

Thomas Gray

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hood

Thomas Lodge

Thomas Lord Vaux

Thomas Lovell Beddoes

Thomas Nashe

Thomas Randolph

Tu Fu

Virgil

Walt Whitman

Wilfred Owen

William Allingham

William Barnes

William Blake

William Butler Yeats

William Cullen Bryant

William Henry Drummond

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Shakespeare

William Wilfred Campbell

William Wordsworth

COLLECTION 2

Alfred Lord Tennyson

Christina Rossetti

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Dylan Thomas

E. E. Cummings

Elizabeth B. Browning

Emily Dickinson

George Herbert

Langston Hughes

Oscar Wilde

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Robert Browning

Robert Burns

Robert Frost

Robert Herrick

Shel Silverstein
Sir Walter Scott
T. S. Eliot

William Butler Yeats

William Morris

Thomas Moore

William Shakespeare

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Love Poems
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Teenage Poems
Friendship Poems
Wedding Poems
Birthday Poems
Religious Poems
Valentine Poems
Christmas Poems
Anniversary Poems
Readers Poems
Contributed Poems
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Welcome to Famous Poems - Nothing but Well Known Poetry by Famous Poets! On this site you will find some of the greatest poems ever written - check out our comprehensive list of Famous Poets on the left-hand side. Choose your favourite poet - but also take a look at some of the other famous poems we have collected for you - enjoy!! There is also a selection of 20,000 famous short poems and love poems to choose from - see lower on this page. Whether you are looking for inspiration for a Valentine card or a wedding speech you are sure to find many treasures within these web pages . . . . enjoy.

 
 
The Famous-Poems.biz MUST READ famous poems  ::

A Red, Red Rose by Robert Burns

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Sir Galahad by Lord Alfred Tennyson

The Charge of the Light Brigade by Lord Alfred Tennyson

The Lady of Shalott by Lord Alfred Tennyson

The Blessed Damozel by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti

The Poor Ghost by Christina Rossetti

Sonnets from the Portuguese by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

I Cannot Live With You by Emily Dickinson

Affliction by George Herbert

Funeral Blues by W.H. Auden

The Dole of the King's Daughter by Oscar Wilde

Celestial Love by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Two In The Campagna by Robert Browning

'Twas the Night Before Christmas by Major H. Livingston

The Fairy Temple; Or, Oberon's Chapel by Robert Herrick

No Second Troy by William Butler Yeats

In Arthur's House by William Morris

Auld Lang Syne by Robert Burns

Tam O'Shanter by Robert Burns

If You Have Seen by Thomas Moore

Deaths And Entrances by Dylan Thomas

Epithalamion by e. e. cummings

Let America Be America Again by Langston Hughes

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

Sick by Shel Silverstein

Cloony The Clown by Shel Silverstein

The Lady of the Lake by Sir Walter Scott

Coronach by Sir Walter Scott

The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot

Daffodils by William Wordsworth

   
 

This weeks top famous poems:

 

The Kiss by Dante Gabriel Rosetti
What smouldering senses in death's sick delay
Or seizure of malign vicissitude
Can rob this body of honour, or denude
This soul of wedding-raiment worn to-day?
For lo! even now my lady's lips did play
With these my lips such consonant interlude
As laurelled Orpheus longed for when he wooed
The half-drawn hungering face with that last lay.

I was a child beneath her touch, a man
When breast to breast we clung, even I and she,
A spirit when her spirit looked through me,
A god when all our life-breath met to fan
Our life-blood, till love's emulous ardours ran,
Fire within fire, desire in deity.

 

 

A Red, Red Rose  by Robert Burns

O my Luve 's like a red, red rose
That 's newly sprung in June:
O my Luve 's like the melodie
That's sweetly play'd in tune!

As fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
So deep in luve am I:
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
Till a' the seas gang dry:

Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear,
And the rocks melt wi' the sun;
I will luve thee still, my dear,
While the sands o' life shall run.

And fare thee weel, my only Luve,
And fare thee weel a while!
And I will come again, my Luve,
Tho' it were ten thousand mile.

 
 
Famous Short Poems by your favourite Poets - more than 10,000 short poems for your enjoyment

A. A. Milne

A. E. Housman

Alexander Pope

Alexander Pushkin

Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alice Walker

Allen Ginsberg

Ambrose Bierce

Anne Bronte

Anne Sexton

Benjamin Franklin

C. S. Lewis

Carl Sandburg

Charles Kingsley

Charlotte Bronte

Chief Dan George

Christina Rossetti

Christopher Marlowe

D.H.Lawrence

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Dorothy Parker

Dylan Thomas

E. E. Cummings

Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Lee Masters

Edmund Spenser

Edna St. Vincent Millay

Edward Lear

Edwin Morgan

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Jennings

Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Emily Bronte

Emily Dickinson

George Eliot

George Herbert

George Meredith

George William Russell

Harold Pinter

Hartley Coleridge

Helen Hunt Jackson

Henry Vaughan

Hilaire Belloc

Isaac Watts

J. R. R. Tolkien

James Henry Leigh Hunt

James Joyce

Jane Austen

Jean Valentine

John Keats

John Ruskin

Jonathan Swift

Katherine Anne Porter

Lady Mary Chudleigh

Langston Hughes

Lewis Carroll

Lord Alfred Tennyson

Lord Byron

Louisa May Alcott

Mark Twain

Mary Elizabeth Coleridge

Michael Drayton

Michael Flanders

Muriel Stuart

Oscar Wilde

Pam Ayres

Phillis Wheatley

Rainer Maria Rilke

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Richard Hugo

Richard Lovelace

Roald Dahl

Robert Browning

Robert Burns

Robert Frost

Robert Graves

Robert Greene

Robert Hayden

Robert Herrick

Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert William Service

Rudyard Kipling

Rupert Brooke

Samuel Coleridge

Samuel Johnson

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Sarah Teasdale

Seamus Heaney

Shel Silverstein

Sir Thomas Wyatt

Sir Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Scott

Spike Milligan

Stuart and Linda Macfarlane

Stuart Macfarlane

Stuart McLean

T. S. Eliot

Ted Hughes

Ted Kooser

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Moore

Thomas Nashe

Victor Hugo

Virgil

W.B. Yeats

W.H. Auden

Walt Whitman

Walter de la Mare

William Blake

William Butler Yeats

William Cole

William Drummond

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Morris

William Shakespeare

William Topaz McGonagall

William Wordsworth

Witt Wittmann

Famous Love Poems by Great Poets - more than 5,000 love poems for that wedding speech

Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin

Algernon Charles Swinburne

Andrew Marvell

Anne Bronte

Charlotte Bronte

Christina Rossetti

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Edgar Allan Poe

Edward Lear

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Emily Bronte

Emily Dickinson

Ernest Dowson

George Meredith

Henry Lawson

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

John Donne

John Dryden

John Keats

Joyce Kilmer

Katharine Lee Bates

Katherine Mansfield

Lord Alfred Tennyson

Lord Byron

Matthew Arnold

Oliver Wendell Holmes

Oscar Wilde

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Rabindranath Tagore

Richard Lovelace

Robert Browning

Robert Burns

Robert Herrick

Robert Louis Stevenson

Rudyard Kipling

Rupert Brooke

Sarah Teasdale

Sidney Lanier

Sir Thomas Wyatt

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Lodge

Thomas Moore

Virgil

Walt Whitman

William Blake

William Butler Yeats

William Shakespeare

Famous Funny Poems by Hilarious Poets - more than 1,000 funny poems to tickle your fickle

Funny Poems 1

Funny Poems 2

Funny Poems 3

Funny Poems 4

Funny Poems 5

Funny Poems 6

Funny Poems 7

Funny Poems 8

Funny Poems 9

Funny Poems 10

Funny Poems 11

Funny Poems 12

Famous Poems for Children - 1,000 poems for children of all ages

Famous Kids Poems 1

Famous Kids Poems 2

Famous Kids Poems 3

Famous Kids Poems 4

Famous Kids Poems 5

Famous Kids Poems 6

Famous Kids Poems 7

Famous Kids Poems 8

Nursery Rhyme Collection - more than 1,000 Famous Nursery Rhymes for Children

Nursery Rhymes - 1

Nursery Rhymes - 2

Nursery Rhymes - 3

Nursery Rhymes - 4

Nursery Rhymes - 5

Nursery Rhymes - 6

Nursery Rhymes - 7

Nursery Rhymes - 8

Nursery Rhymes - 9

Nursery Rhymes - 10

Nursery Rhymes - 11

Nursery Rhymes - 12

Nursery Rhymes - 13

Nursery Rhymes - 14

Nursery Rhymes - 15

 

Recommended poetry books.

100 Best Poems of all Time

Book Description
Verses to move you, lines you'll love,
from old favourites to modern classics, here are...THE WORDS WE LIVE BY


This perfect poetry companion puts your favorite poetry and poets from around the world at your fingertips. By including only the best-loved or best-known work of each poet, this portable treasury offers the opportunity for every reader to revisit the classics.

 

The Classic Treasury Of Best-Loved Children's Poems

Book Description
Imaginative artwork from best-selling illustrator Penny Dann adds a touch of whimsy to this collection of classic poetry for children from William Wordsworth, Edward Lear, Christina Rossetti, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and many other writers. Children aged 4 to 8 will discover the magic of rhyme as they read forty-eight short poems, sure to spark their imaginations and inspire a love of language.
Original illustrations by Penny Dann bring each timeless favorite to life for a new generation of readers. From the soothing "Lullaby and Good Night" to the silly rhymes of "The Owl and the Pussy-Cat," The Classic Treasury of Best-Loved Children's Poems is an entertaining introduction to the rich possibilities of the English language and the wonderful world of poetry.

 
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More Must Read Famous Poems:

Celestial Love by Ralph Waldo Emerson
Higher far,
Upward, into the pure realm,
Over sun or star,
Over the flickering Dæmon film,
Thou must mount for love,—
Into vision which all form
In one only form dissolves;
In a region where the wheel,
On which all beings ride,
Visibly revolves;
Where the starred eternal worm
Girds the world with bound and term;
Where unlike things are like,
When good and ill,
And joy and moan,
Melt into one.
There Past, Present, Future, shoot
Triple blossoms from one root
Substances at base divided
In their summits are united,
There the holy Essence rolls,
One through separated souls,
And the sunny &Aelig;on sleeps
Folding nature in its deeps,
And every fair and every good
Known in part or known impure
To men below,
In their archetypes endure.

The race of gods,
Or those we erring own,
Are shadows flitting up and down
In the still abodes.
The circles of that sea are laws,
Which publish and which hide the Cause.
Pray for a beam
Out of that sphere
Thee to guide and to redeem.
O what a load
Of care and toil
By lying Use bestowed,
From his shoulders falls, who sees
The true astronomy,
The period of peace!
Counsel which the ages kept,
Shall the well-born soul accept.
As the overhanging trees
Fill the lake with images,
As garment draws the garment's hem
Men their fortunes bring with them;
By right or wrong,
Lands and goods go to the strong;
Property will brutely draw
Still to the proprietor,
Silver to silver creep and wind,
And kind to kind,
Nor less the eternal poles
Of tendency distribute souls.
There need no vows to bind
Whom not each other seek but find.
They give and take no pledge or oath,
Nature is the bond of both.
No prayer persuades, no flattery fawns,
Their noble meanings are their pawns.
Plain and cold is their address,
Power have they for tenderness,
And so thoroughly is known
Each others' purpose by his own,
They can parley without meeting,
Need is none of forms of greeting,
They can well communicate
In their innermost estate;
When each the other shall avoid,
Shall each by each be most enjoyed.
Not with scarfs or perfumed gloves
Do these celebrate their loves,
Not by jewels, feasts, and savors,
Not by ribbons or by favors,
But by the sun-spark on the sea,
And the cloud-shadow on the lea,
The soothing lapse of morn to mirk,
And the cheerful round of work.
Their cords of love so public are,
They intertwine the farthest star.
The throbbing sea, the quaking earth,
Yield sympathy and signs of mirth;
Is none so high, so mean is none,
But feels and seals this union.
Even the tell Furies are appeased,
The good applaud, the lost are eased.

Love's hearts are faithful, but not fond,
Bound for the just, but not beyond;
Not glad, as the low-loving herd,
Of self in others still preferred,
But they have heartily designed
The benefit of broad mankind.
And they serve men austerely,
After their own genius, clearly,
Without a false humility;
For this is love's nobility,
Not to scatter bread and gold,
Goods and raiment bought and sold,
But to hold fast his simple sense,
And speak the speech of innocence,
And with hand, and body, and blood,
To make his bosom-counsel good:
For he that feeds men, serveth few,
He serves all, who dares be true.

Deaths And Entrances by Dylan Thomas
On almost the incendiary eve
Of several near deaths,
When one at the great least of your best loved
And always known must leave
Lions and fires of his flying breath,
Of your immortal friends
Who'd raise the organs of the counted dust
To shoot and sing your praise,
One who called deepest down shall hold his peace
That cannot sink or cease
Endlessly to his wound
In many married London's estranging grief.

On almost the incendiary eve
When at your lips and keys,
Locking, unlocking, the murdered strangers weave,
One who is most unknown,
Your polestar neighbour, sun of another street,
Will dive up to his tears.
He'll bathe his raining blood in the male sea
Who strode for your own dead
And wind his globe out of your water thread
And load the throats of shells
with every cry since light
Flashed first across his thunderclapping eyes.

On almost the incendiary eve
Of deaths and entrances,
When near and strange wounded on London's waves
Have sought your single grave,
One enemy, of many, who knows well
Your heart is luminous
In the watched dark, quivering through locks and caves,
Will pull the thunderbolts
To shut the sun, plunge, mount your darkened keys
And sear just riders back,
Until that one loved least
Looms the last Samson of your zodiac.

Funeral Blues by W.H. Auden
Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message He is Dead.
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, my South, my East and West,
My working week and my Sunday rest,
My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
I thought that love would last forever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now; put out every one,
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun,
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the woods;
For nothing now can ever come to any good.

Sick by Shel Silverstein
"I cannot go to school today,"
Said little Peggy Ann McKay,
"I have the measles and the mumps,
A gash, a rash, and purple bumps.
My mouth is wet, my throat is dry,
I'm going blind in my right eye.
My tonsils are as big as rocks,
I've counted sixteen chicken pox
And there's one more--that's seventeen,
And don't you think my face looks green?
My leg is cut, my eyes are blue--
It might be instamatic flu.
I cough and sneeze and gasp and choke,
I'm sure that my left leg is broke--
My hip hurts when I move my chin,
My belly button's caving in,
My back is wrenched, my ankle's sprained,
My 'pendix pains each time it rains.
My nose is cold, my toes are numb,
I have a sliver in my thumb.
My neck is stiff, my voice is weak,
I hardly whisper when I speak.
My tongue is filling up my mouth,
I think my hair is falling out.
My elbow's bent, my spine ain't straight,
My temperature is one-o-eight.
My brain is shrunk, I cannot hear,
There is a hole inside my ear.
I have a hangnail, and my heart is--what?
What's that? What's that you say?
You say today is---Saturday?
G'bye, I'm going out to play!"

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveller, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,
And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I-
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.